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Links for June 2010

Looking back over the month that was…

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Return of the Links Digest

After a long absence, the links roundup is back from the grave.  What can I say?  Life’s been too busy, but now, fortified with six eight shots of espresso [‘I could see colors that weren’t in the visible spectrum…’], I give you a summary of animal law and animal rights related links from the last few weeks.

Chalk another death up to animal rights insanity and to the ongoing failure of the West to take counsel on practical matters from the Scripture.

Saturday Links

zoo

  • Last week, Vincent J. Guihan of We Other Animals wrote about the things he’s grateful for, as an abolitionist vegan.  Well worth the read.
  • Zoo hires actors to portray cavemen.  Wait.  What?
  • We are indeed “closer to animals than we sometimes think,” but this ridiculous publicity stunt does nothing to help people see that.

    B. Terrorist Threat. What terrorist activities have occurred in or around your building/facility in the past 5 years (documented cases)? Please check all that apply.

    [ ] Attack from international terrorists
    [ ] Attack from domestic special interest terrorists
    -[ ] Earth Liberation Front (ELF)
    -[ ] Animal Liberation Front (ALF)
    -[ ] People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA)
    -[ ] Animal Defense League (ADL)
    -[ ] Stop Huntingdon Animal Cruelty (SHAC)
    -[ ] Formal hate group(s) (please specify):
    -[ ] Other (please specify): ____________________
    [ ] Cyber Attack from a known or unknown source.

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    Saturday Links

    • eatinganimalsbookcoverOn Sunday, the New Yorker posted an in-depth review of Jon Safran Foer’s Eating Animals, titled ‘Flesh of Your Flesh: Should you eat meat?’.  To quote:

    But is even veganism really enough? The cost that consumer society imposes on the planet’s fifteen or so million non-human species goes way beyond either meat or eggs. Bananas, bluejeans, soy lattes, the paper used to print this magazine, the computer screen you may be reading it on—death and destruction are embedded in them all. It is hard to think at all rigorously about our impact on other organisms without being sickened.

    “Eating Animals” closes with a turkey-less Thanksgiving. As a holiday, it doesn’t sound like a lot of fun. But this is Foer’s point. We are, he suggests, defined not just by what we do; we are defined by what we are willing to do without. Vegetarianism requires the renunciation of real and irreplaceable pleasures. To Foer’s credit, he is not embarrassed to ask this of us.

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